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vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin. It is essential for good health and linked to a lower risk of several conditions, including multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis, some cancers, and type 1 diabetes. Most people get enough vitamin D from sun exposure to their skin. People who are not regularly exposed to sunlight may need to take supplements. A deficiency can cause bone disorders such as osteoporosis, weak muscles, and an increased risk of common illnesses such as colds and flu. In 2011, the United States Institute of Medicine (IOM) reviewed the requirements for Vitamin D intake in adults. Based on this review, they recommend that adults under 50 receive 600 IU per day, and those over 50 receive 800 IU per day.



Vitamin D is a hormone produced in the skin when it is exposed to sunlight.


Vitamin D is a hormone produced in the skin when it is exposed to sunlight. It can also be absorbed from food or supplements, which plays a role in bone health and immune function.

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that comes in two forms: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). The best source of vitamin D is the sun—specifically ultraviolet B rays (UVB), which stimulates the production of this essential nutrient. Vitamin D levels can also be boosted by eating fish such as herring, sardines, salmon, or tuna; fortified milk products; eggs; meat from pigs fed organically grown grains; mushrooms exposed to UV light after harvest; an egg yolk for every four ounces of cod liver oil consumed daily over several months following conception until birth will help prevent rickets in children under age one who mothers breastfeed with insufficient intake of dietary sources because they have been malnourished themselves during pregnancy due to lack of access to quality food supply chains due to war zones where conflict has disrupted safe food distribution networks.


It is a fat-soluble vitamin that can also be ingested in food or taken as a health supplement.


Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that can also be ingested in food or taken as a health supplement. Vitamin D is present in fish, eggs, and fortified foods such as cereal.

Vitamin D is stored in the body fat, and when you've used up what you have stored, you must get more from your diet or supplements to maintain healthy levels of the vitamin.


It is essential for good health and linked to a lower risk of several conditions, including multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis, some cancers, and type 1 diabetes.


Vitamin D is essential for good health. It has been linked to a lower risk of several conditions, including multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis, some cancers, and type 1 diabetes.

It's also thought that vitamin D may help prevent falls in older people and improve bone strength.

You can get vitamin D from sunlight on your skin or by eating certain foods like oily fish or cereals fortified with vitamin D. You can also take supplements containing the vitamin if you don't get enough from food and sunlight.

How much vitamin D do I need? The short answer is that most of us need more than we currently get. Government recommendations say that adults and children over one should have ten micrograms (mcg) of vitamin D each day. However, many people in the UK don't get enough in their diet or sunlight on their skin.



Most people get enough vitamin D from sun exposure to their skin.


Vitamin D is essential for a variety of functions in your body, including keeping your bones strong, regulating the amount of calcium and phosphate in your blood, promoting normal blood pressure levels, and helping you fight infections. According to research published by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2010, at least 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to be deficient in vitamin D. In addition; some experts say that taking too much vitamin D can lead to health problems such as kidney stones or high blood pressure.[1] The Institute of Medicine recommends that adults up to age 70 need 600 international units (IU) per day from food sources or supplements; those over 70 should take 800 IU/day.


People who are not regularly exposed to sunlight may need to take supplements.


You may need to take vitamin D supplements if you have:

  • Dark skin. People with naturally dark skin, such as African Americans or Hispanics, are at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency than people with lighter skin. This can occur because their bodies cannot produce much vitamin D in response to sunlight exposure or because they have darker pigments that absorb more UV rays and prevent the production of vitamin D.

  • Housebound lifestyle. Suppose you're housebound for long periods without access to sunlight. In that case, you'll likely need a supplement or another source of vitamins so that your body can function properly and maintain healthy levels of calcium and phosphorus in your bones and blood cells (two nutrients necessary for healthy bone growth).

  • Northern latitude residence/work indoors all day long job (elderly). Northern latitude residents may be at risk for developing rickets due to a lack of natural sunlight exposure during winter months when days are shorter than 12 hours long; people who work indoors also fall into this category due to lack of natural sunlight while they're at work.

In addition to sunbathing and taking supplements, another way you can help increase your vitamin D intake is by eating foods high in vitamin—oily fish such as salmon or sardines, eggs, and dairy products like milk and cheese; fortified breakfast cereals are some examples.



How much vitamin D do I need?


The recommended daily vitamin D intake for most people is 600 IU (international units) per day for adults and 800 IU for pregnant or breastfeeding women. If you're over age 71, the RDA increases to 800 IU daily. The tolerable upper intake level (UL), the maximum amount of a nutrient that can be safely consumed regularly, has been set at 4,000 IU per day. The ULs are based on observed adverse effects in several studies. Because it's possible that these values could be too high or too low to prevent disease in the long run, they should not be considered an absolute limit on how much vitamin D you can take every day without risking harm.

* Milk: 1 cup of whole milk contains just over 100 IU; 1 cup of nonfat milk contains 97 IU. * Oily fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines: 3 ounces cooked provides 360 to 600 IU. * Cod liver oil: 1 teaspoon provides 1,360 IU.


In 2011, the United States Institute of Medicine (IOM) reviewed the requirements for vitamin D.


You may want to take a vitamin D supplement if you:

  • Get less than 15 minutes of sunlight daily (5-30 minutes is ideal).

  • Don't eat much fish or drink milk.

  • Live in northern latitudes, where winter sun is weaker.

  • Have darker skin and therefore produce less vitamin D when exposed to sunlight.

Vitamin D is essential for good health. It helps the body absorb calcium, which is necessary for bone growth and maintenance. Too little vitamin D can cause rickets in children (softening bones due to inadequate amounts of calcium) and osteomalacia in adults (chilling bones due to insufficient quantities).


It is essential to get enough vitamin D.


While most people get enough vitamin D from sunlight, it is still essential to get the right amount—especially if you live in a northern city. Research shows that many Canadians are deficient in this crucial nutrient.

Vitamin D plays a vital role in keeping your bones and teeth healthy. It also helps your body absorb calcium and phosphorus (essential nutrients for healthy teeth and bones).



Conclusion


Understanding the importance of vitamin D is key to maintaining and improving your health. With so much conflicting information, knowing which sources are reliable can be difficult. Do your research and find out what works best for you!

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