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seasonal depression symptoms and causes

Updated: Sep 5


Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), also called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), is a type of depression that occurs at the same time each year — usually during the winter months. It can be difficult to treat and may recur from year to year.



Seasonal depression, also called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), is a type of depression that occurs during the same time each year — usually during the winter months.


Seasonal depression is a type of mood disorder that occurs during the same time each year — usually during the winter months. It is also called seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Seasonal depression is a recognized type of depression and requires treatment, just like other forms of depression.


Seasonal depression is more than just "the winter blues" or "cabin fever." It is a recognized type of depression that requires treatment, just like other forms of depression.


Seasonal depression is more than just "the winter blues" or "cabin fever." It is a recognized type of depression that requires treatment, just like other forms of depression.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is considered a subtype of major depressive disorder (MDD), which the American Psychiatric Association defines as an ongoing feeling that one's life lacks meaning or purpose and that one cannot experience pleasure from previously enjoyed activities. The symptoms must be present most days for at least two weeks and must cause significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

Depression can also be classified into two types: major depression and bipolar disorder, both of which involve changes in the mood but differ in how those changes manifest themselves. In MDD, the patient experiences sadness without manic episodes; bipolar patients experience both states with their moods swinging between highs and lows over time."




SAD is characterized by having symptoms of major depression only at a specific time of the year, usually in the fall and winter, and getting better only during spring and summer.


SAD is characterized by having symptoms of major depression only at a specific time of the year, usually in the fall and winter, and getting better only during spring and summer.

Symptoms of SAD include:

  • Depression

  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism

  • Anxiety

  • Lack of interest in activities you once enjoyed

In addition to these symptoms, those with the seasonal affective disorder may also experience a change in eating habits. They might eat more or less food than usual during this time. Some people will also gain weight while they are depressed; others lose weight.


While seasonal depression generally appears successful in nearly 75 percent of those who seek treatment for SAD, the symptoms can return the following season.


While seasonal depression generally appears successful in nearly 75 percent of those who seek treatment for SAD, the symptoms can return the following season. The light therapy used to treat SAD has been shown to prevent the recurrence of SAD by approximately 50 percent, but antidepressants are not effective as a preventive measure.

In addition to light therapy and medication, there are other methods that may be helpful in reducing or preventing seasonal affective disorder:


-Exercise regularly. Exercise can be an effective way to alleviate the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder. It’s thought that exercise may help raise your serotonin levels, which can improve mood and reduce anxiety.


-Eat a balanced diet. Eating a healthy, balanced diet can help you feel better during the winter months. It’s important to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables as well as whole grains and lean proteins.


-Get enough sleep. Getting enough sleep is important for your overall health and well-being. If you’re not getting enough sleep at night, try to get up earlier in the morning so that you can enjoy some quiet time before starting your day.


-Stay connected to others. It’s important to stay connected with other people as much as possible during the winter months. Try spending time with family and friends, or volunteer at a local food bank or homeless shelter.


-Get outside. Try to go for a walk or run each day, even if it’s just for 20 minutes. The fresh air and sunshine will help you feel better physically and emotionally.

-Stay active. Even though the cold weather may make it difficult to get out of bed early in the morning, try to take advantage of daylight hours by walking around your neighborhood or going up and down stairs at home instead of taking the elevator.


-Keep your mind active. Try to do a crossword puzzle or brain teaser every day, which will help keep your mind sharp. -Take care of yourself. Eat well and get enough sleep so that you can feel energized throughout the day.


-Stay social. Even though you may be feeling down, don’t isolate yourself from friends and family. Reach out for support if you need it.



There are several ways to treat seasonal depression. You may need to try several before you find one that works well for you.

  • Psychotherapy.

  • Medications.

  • Vitamin D supplementation.

  • Light therapy.

Other types of treatment may also be useful for some people, including exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).


The first-line line therapy for seasonal depression is light therapy, which involves sitting next to a light box each morning for 20 to 30 minutes or longer.


The first-line line therapy for seasonal depression is light therapy, which involves sitting next to a light box each morning for 20 to 30 minutes or longer. Light therapy can be used year-round, and it’s safe.


Light boxes are sold over the Internet and at some pharmacies and health stores. The cost varies depending on the size of the box and where you purchase it from. You may also be able to find them at local clinics and hospitals in your area if you want to talk with a professional before purchasing one yourself online or from a pharmacy.


Most people who use this type of treatment report that they feel better after just one week, but it may take several weeks before all symptoms go away completely, especially if your depression has been severe for many years or if you have had problems with seasonal issues since childhood such as SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder).


Other types of treatment include psychotherapy, medications, and vitamin D supplementation.


Other types of treatment include psychotherapy, medications, and vitamin D supplementation. If you're considering medication, talk to your doctor about the possible side effects and benefits before taking them.

As with any health condition, it's important that you consult your doctor if you think that you may be battling seasonal depression. There are many ways to manage this condition successfully - but only if you seek help when needed!



Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs at the same time each year. It's sometimes called "winter depression" because symptoms are typically more severe during the winter.


Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs at the same time each year. It's sometimes called "winter depression" because symptoms are typically more severe during the winter months, but some people experience SAD in summer instead.


Conclusion


If you're feeling depressed during the fall and winter months, it's important to talk with your doctor about your symptoms. They can help you determine if they're related to SAD or another type of depression. If they are, there are treatments available that can help you feel better.

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